Photo from Ingham


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Ingham in Domesday

Population (2011) of Ingham: 451.

Local licensing authority for Ingham is St Edmundsbury.

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About Ingham

Ingham is mostly tucked away behind the busy A134, on the edge of the Brecklands. The village was once part of the massive Culford Estate, which stretched over 5 parishes until its dissolution in the 1930s. At this time the forestry commission bought much of the land to plant King's Forest, just to the west of the village. Today the forest is a haven for walkers, riders and various forms of wildlife. There is a picnic site in West Stow close to the Icknield Way footpath. Livermere Lake is one of the largest stretches of freshwater in West Suffolk.

Seven Hills Halt in the north of the parish and Ingham Station on the Ampton road, were on the Thetford to Bury St Edmunds line. They closed in 1953 along with the line. During the excavation of a cutting between the two stations at Cowpath Breck, a Romano-British cemetery was unearthed. Another Romano-British cemetery was found by farm workers in 1823, in the south west of the parish near the boundary with Culford.

The "Seven Hills" are ancient burial barrows (three still remain). These are said to mark the graves of victims of the 1173 Battle of Fornham - either seven barons who died in the battle or the soldiers.

Ingham was recorded as "Incham" in Domesday.


Some historical information from English Heritage's National Monuments Record

(1861 census information from Malcolm Fairley)